Charlie and the Photography Factory

October 5, 2009

My “Sojourn” in Texas

Filed under: Austin, Texas — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — charlieprator @ 6:23 PM

What a strange feeling it was to be back in warm Texas after 6 months with the thought that this was only temporary. It was a vacation–not a return home.  I would be going back to live another 6 months abroad in vackra Sverige!

Knowing this, I made the best of my time there doing what every Texan should do knowing that their creature comforts would be gone soon enough:

  • I ate Taco Bell, numerous times.
  • Drank Dr. Pepper at almost every meal
  • Coerced myself to enjoy a Bud Lite (hard to do after drinking quality beers such as Heineken and Carlsberg)
  • Drove. Everywhere.
  • Floated the river. Twice.
  • Visited Austin. Twice.
  • Came close to re-negging on my decision on going back to Sweden whilst visitng Aggieland–four times.

Anyways, I could go on, but it’s time for the picture.  Whilst in Texas I had the awesome opportunity to attend Trey Ratcliff’s (Yes, that guy that does HDR that I always mention here, stuckincustoms.com) Photowalk, and it was such a great event.  My buddy Raul and I both went, met other avid (HDR) photographers, and had a small chat with Trey.   Here’s one of my results from that night:

Capitol

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June 22, 2009

Vidova Gora – Croatia’s “Mt. Everest”

First, apologies for the lack of posts on the blog.  I have been doing some extensive travelling (Krakow, Stockholm, Croatia, Paris, Malmö, and tomorrow Barcelona), and have had very sporadic internet. Thus, preventing any daily uploading.

Speaking of daily upload,  apologies for that too.  In good news, I have developed a serious back-up of wonderful photos to show you in the coming fall semester.  Stay tuned for Auschwitz-Birkenau,  more Croatia,  cathedrals from Krakow, and other gems.

And, now for today’s post, which was pressured for promulgation from my friends and fellow hikers:

Crew View

This is the view from the highest mountain in all of the Adriatic islands: Vidova Gora in Bol, Croatia.  Emil (The Dark Knight, remember?), Rob (Dodge’s cool friend), Dodge (a dear friend from highschool), and I scaled this mountain for a sunset in about two hours.  It was one of the best memories of Croatia specifically for all the things we saw ( we found a cave, a mountain-top bar, annoyed mountain sheep, and endured some night hiking).  I think if Bear Grylls were to hear about this adventure he would even be impressed…

Except for the part on how we reacted when we saw this:

Spider1

But, what can you expect? It’s abdomen was the size of your thumb, and the web large enough to capture humans! Okay, I was lying about the last part.

Spider2

In any case, this sucker made us all turn into little school girls cautiously walking as to prevent another encounter with one of these crawlers.  Imagine going back through these thickets at night again, with knowledge of them around!

May 19, 2009

And, “Whooosh” Goes the Windmill

Filed under: Sweden, Visingsö — Tags: , , , , , , — charlieprator @ 10:38 PM

Windmill

On our bike trip over Visingsö our troupe had the pleasure of relaxin’ under this behemoth.  We laid down. Eyes gazing sky-ward. Sun toasting the atmosphere. Blades slicing through the air particles above.  It was kind of a cool sight to see up close.

If you get a chance, try it next time.  They’re immense works of energy harnessing ingenuity.  

 

May 18, 2009

The House on Visingsö Row

Filed under: Sweden, Visingsö — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — charlieprator @ 6:57 PM

House

Welcome back to the factory.  I hope you enjoy today’s story and photo–fresh off the factory floor.

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of venturing to Visingsö, the big island located in the middle of Lake Vättern.   After enjoying some sandwiches and wine near 16th century castle ruins, we embarked on our adventure through the many parts of northern Visingsö.

During our bike ride we got the chance to rest under an electric windmill, visit a secluded Swedish trinket and tea shop (Where I got a Jaw Harp. Does anyone know how to play it),  relax on the island’s beach, and enjoy a red sunset.  All of it recorded on my camera, and soon to be enjoyed on this site.

This whole island was filled with small cottages like these, and in these cottages were the stereotypical grandma and grandpas.  It was kind of like the place you would imagine every matured married couple dreams about retiring.  Somewhere quiet. Somewhere secluded.  Somewhere peaceful enough to rest.  It was almost, ¨too idyllic,¨ as Amy put it.

Although, Sweden is quite the dual world.  In the winter Sweden succumbs to cold covered skies of dreary clouds, and an overall lack of brightness and color. However, when that suns peaks for the first time everything transforms.  In thinking about this,  I believe I have experienced more perfect weather days in Sweden than I did back home. But, that could’ve been because in Texas we never really had the dreary weather to put perfect weather into perspective.

Speaking of home, I have finally made the decision to stay in Sweden.  It had been on mind for quite some time, and until recently I didn’t have the full scale of obstacles in front of me.   Be that as it may,  I decided to stick with my plan, and plow through the red tape (I mean thats all life is regardless of the locale–red tape).

May 13, 2009

Living in Jönköping

Filed under: Jönköping, Sweden — Tags: , , , , , , , — charlieprator @ 1:22 AM

Blue Skies

This house is located in my neighborhood, and on my walk home I noticed its beauty while seeing the sunset behind the hill.  I am very lucky to live where I live.  A five minute walk I can find an outdoor restaurant/pub, a soccer stadium (now showing games), a waterfall, and an animal farm!  As you’ve probably seen before, the view on the hill is quite splendid in the mornings, as I am able to see all of Jönköping. 

If you’re as lucky as Amy or Joseph to come see this place, you’ll always have a couch to crash on.

May 11, 2009

Once You Start HDR, You’re Raising the Bar

Group1

A long time ago, when I was still in highschool,  I had reached a plateau in my photography.  I had lost the interest in it, and the joy of finding those shots that can spur the rush of emotions it instigates in people.   For awhile, I had tried to figure out why my interest was waning in a hobby I used to love so much, and I had come to the conclusion that there was a lack of real world imitation that my photos had.  Time and time again, I would take shots of landscapes and people, only to find the shot never accurately portrayed what I saw.  The skys would be over-exposed losing all detail. Or, my subject was underexposed, thus not illuminating the correct colors of skin, eyes, clothing, flowers, etc.  I could never fully capture and show people the visually satiating image I had seen via the duller photographic representation I had taken.  It had become frustrating, and with time I stopped taking photos.

Then, years later along came HDR.  Although the process is many years old, it wasn’t until recently (I think) that HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography had come into professional acceptance and public demand.  I had stumbled on to Trey Ratcliff’s site and had my mind blown away.  For the first time, I saw correct representational photography of our world.   I read his “How To” on HDR, and found myself with a new project to embark on.  A week later I was in Kiruna, Sweden at the ICEHOTEL snapping away, learning about the process, and  enjoying the results 100%.  Finally, my joy of photography and post-shoot development had been rekindled.

If you’ve been around me within the last 3 months you’ve heard enough about my new hobby.  Understandingly, everyone pokes fun at the process by mocking me, “Okay, guys now I need you to stand really still.  There’s gonna be 3 photos…”  But, when they see the results they understand the difference.  So, here’s another chance to understand.  Above, is the final product of a total of 30 minutes of relaxed photo development.  The process, which uses an application called Photomatix, takes 3 differently exposed images, perfectly exposed, over-exposed, and under-exposed, and stacks them together.  Below, I have taken the three images (right half of picture) and bled them through for you to see the differences. 

Each photo explains some of my earlier frustrations.  The  first stripe is over-exposed, and has lost the details in the sky.  The middle stripe is perfectly exposed, but has lost a slight degree of color. Finally, the last stripe is under-exposed revealing the details in the clouds, but has lost all color in the trash-can.  In short, each photo brings it’s respective cards the table, and is then stacked together via Photomatix to get the above image–the closest representation of Råslätt that day.  We see the colors on the building. The grass is a vibrant green.  The clouds in the sky are seen. It is as vivid as I had seen it.  True photographic representation. The bar has been raised, has it not? Do you see the difference? 

Group1 Example

May 9, 2009

The Little Ship that…Couldn’t – Part Två

Filed under: Stockholm, Sweden — Tags: , , , , , , , , — charlieprator @ 12:37 AM

Vasa Side

Lets conclude this story, shall we? 

As you already know, not even 400 ft from the shore, in front of thousands of on-lookers Vasa sunk, bringing down with her 30-50 of her passengers.  The catastrophe quickly spread around Sweden, and eventually to King Adolphus in Poland, who demanded punishment for the ship-builders.  But, whats funny is, Vasa, being so large had her masts sticking out Stockholm’s harbor for many days after its capsizing.  It served as a daily reminder of Sweden’s failure, and money gone to absolute waste.  Accounts tell that someone, by order of parliamentary officials, had to go out to the mast and saw it down!

Following the sinking, a formal investigation was initiated by King Adolphus to find someone guilty.  All the ship workers and sailors were interrogated only to find no one guilty. Why? Well, everyone pointed fingers to the guy in charge of them until it reached the original ship architect and engineer.  He was 6 feet under.

At the end of it all, people moved on.  Times changed.  Sweden went on to be a super-power. Then, they lost that status to the British. Later on, IKEA was founded. Then came the 1950s , and it was rediscovered!

Sweden, now in the 20th century finally had technology to properly resurrect the ship–with care, of course.  And, this is the real interesting part.  They excavated it by constructing 1 meter wide tunnels going under the entire ship (under/through the harbor floor).  Now, keep in mind silt had covered the ship all the way to the second gun deck.  And, the divers of the day wore atmosphere suits, worked in zero visibility, in 1 meter wide tunnels (talk about claustrophobia)–alone. 

Once the tunnels were complete, heavy gauged wire was looped through the tunnels, and it slowly hoisted up.  Today, after much preservation techniques, it is on display at one of the coolest museums I’ve ever been to.

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